READ THIS NOW! 5 Great Ways to Add Urgency to Your Site

You must act on this NOW!

Urgency is a very successful strategy that can be used by any business at any time.  In fact, this type of strategy is projected to us daily and has been for years via newspaper advertisements, media, and TV.  Just to name a few of those that use a call to action successfully:  the government, the IRS, public schools, restaurants, hotels, and stores.

How does it work?  Let’s take a test.  What is the deadline for filing your taxes?  Correct, April 15th.  When do most public schools start their fall semester?  Correct again, in September after Labor Day.  How do you know that? And why did your immediate response come automatically?

Every year, hotels advertise their special rates; restaurants let you know their reduced menu days, the IRS reminds you of its impending annual tax filing deadline, schools send out their notices of registration, and stores continually advertise closeouts and sales.

The reason these varied campaigns are so successful is that they are creating importance, value, and sense of urgency to a targeted audience.  If you are interested in purchasing the latest and greatest iPhone, you might not pay attention to a closeout sale on washers and dryers.  The exact opposite is true as well.

Therefore, creating urgency is a highly successful endeavor, but only when that urgency brings value, importance, and relevance to its audience.  The visual word, associated with the right image, has a powerful effect on people.

The Marriage of Imagery and Content

Sirloin Steak - this Wednesday's Special

Restaurants advertise vivid images of their food, and, if you are honest, you can almost taste that pasta sauce or smell the aroma of that perfectly broiled sirloin steak pictured before you.  A combined image and message plays upon our minds almost like a repeat performance on stage.

Now you can see how important it is to integrate these ideas into your own marketing campaigns and websites, creating a message and image that will engage your audience, enticing them to click on that call to action.

Remember, the entire reason behind any marketing campaign is to persuade and convince your readers to make a decision, preferably in your favor.  Whether it is to buy a product, sign up for your newsletter, or fill out a survey, you want to see positive results and have them act on it immediately, without procrastinating.

If you are scratching your head and wondering where to begin, here are a few suggested plans of action to achieve these goals. Make sure your website represents and parallels your product, service, and image alongside your call to action.

  1. Time Limited Offer.  Putting a time and date on an offer creates a very strong message.  You want to offer value and savings but at the same time create a time limit.  Expiry dates are highly successful when offering reduced prices and closeout deals.
  2. Short Supply:  Having a time limit is much more powerful when coupled with the scarcity approach. Be specific – you are offering this to a certain amount of people, while the supplies last.  A first come, first served approach is extremely catchy.
  3. Offer benefits: This is contingent upon a purchase being made now.  Giving a discount on a customer’s next purchase if they buy now shows your appreciation and gives your sale more value, as it extends to another product they may want to buy or consider.
  4. Gift certificates: Offering gift certificates toward the purchase of other products is a great catalyst.  It is a win-win situation, allowing both parties to benefit.  Both the buyer and the recipient will appreciate your generosity.
  5. Testimonials:  Nothing, but nothing, beats honest, positive feedback from former clients about your company and product.  People influence people; people believe people.

Your Website Must Have a Landing Page

For those of you creating an e-mail newsletter campaign, your call to action will be the particular landing page on your website.  What is a landing page? The landing page is where you have your final call to action and sale.  It is where you want to capture your prospect’s information, or link them directly to a product or download.  It is the conversion page, turning initial interest into final sales.

This page must be clearly defined, easy to parse, with the call to action link, button, or image obvious and easy to find.  Creating a landing page with too much information creates confusion, leading to loss of interest and sales.  Your website is a crucial part of your campaign.

What will happen to me if I don't get this?

Creating Urgency is NOT Creating Fraud or Fear

No matter how valuable your product or service is, no one will die without it, or suffer any grave consequences when not making a purchase.  Even inferring that would create suspicion toward your brand and company.  Creating urgency should be linked to creating enthusiasm.  You want people to know that your product or service will enhance and even perhaps make their lives a bit easier.  Wouldn’t we all love that?

Of course, you must always represent what is honest and ethical.  Your product and service should fulfill the expectations being created, and all sales and promotions offered should always be honored and backed up by you 100 percent of the time.

When creating any urgency, never forget that your website is your greatest sales representative and intermediary.

 

Aaron Fletcher

Aaron Fletcher is a small business marketing coach, speaker and author of STAND OUT: A Simple and Effective Online Marketing Plan For Your Small Business. He founded Geek-Free Marketing to help entrepreneurs become leaders in their markets through smart content marketing. Get more from Aaron on Google+, Facebook and Twitter
Geek-Free Marketing
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